My husband is Moroccan and I spent six months there. I can answer this question based on my experience.

Morocco is a very moderate, Muslim country. I would say out of an average 10 women, 7 wore a long dress that covered them from wrist to ankle, and wore a scarf head covering over their hair. None of these women covered their faces. Two women would wear American style clothing such as blue jeans, pants and usually long sleeve shirts. These women also did not cover their hair. One woman out of 10 would wear a full hijab, covering them completely from head to foot. The same woman would also wear gloves and often, sunglasses.

 

In my experience, I would say that it was the woman's choice to wear the hijab. These ladies were honoring their husbands and God. I asked one of my husband's sister's what her reason was for covering her hair, and she said that when she wears her hair covering, she is making a prayer to God.

 

I had an experience with a woman wearing full hijab which took away all of my doubts about this practice. As a visiting American in my husband's small city of youssoufia, I was asked to help give away Awards to local widows. One of the ladies was called up to receive hers from me, and she was wearing full hijab. I of course was dressed like an American, wearing normal street clothes. When I gave her award to her, I could see her eyes. She was smiling up at me with no judgement or fear, but only gratitude. That was the day that I stopped worrying about why women wore hijab. She was honoring her husband who had left her with small children and very little income oh, and she was honoring God.

There are Muslim countries where women do not have these freedoms and may not have the right to choose. Many of the Muslims in countries such as Iraq and Saudi Arabia would live in a more relaxed way if the reigning government would allow them to.

 

Saudi Arabia is beginning to make changes for women, who have been given the right to drive over the past year and also the ability to go out without a male relative.

All of those of the Muslim faith that I have met have been lovely people, and far less judgmental than many American Christians.

 

This is my observation from my time in Morocco. I am Christian and I was treated with respect and welcomed into many homes. I hope this helps you to understand people of the Muslim faith and makes you feel more comfortable around them.

Most people of all faiths are good and caring people. Unfortunately, there are those who are extremists in every faith and cultural group.